Write Source Thesis Statement

An essay is a "short formal piece of writing..dealing with a single subject" ("Essay," 2001). 

Derived from the French word "essai" meaning "experiment" or "attempt," an essay is typically written to try to persuade the reader using selected research evidence ("Essay," 1997).

Students are often required to write essays as course assignments in college-level programs in order to develop many important skills, such as:

  • close reading
  • critical thinking, analysis and interpretation
  • persuasion and argumentation
  • integration of research sources through summary, paraphrase and quotation
  • communicating with clarity and conciseness

There are several different essay genres, which influences the content and structure. In general, an academic essay has three parts:

(1) An introduction that gives the reader an idea of what they are about to learn and presents an argument in the form of a thesis statement

(2) body, or middle section, that provides evidence used to prove and persuade the reader to accept the writer's particular point of view

(3)conclusion that summarizes the content and findings of the essay

 

Thesis Mad Libs

If you are having trouble getting started, try using the models below to generate a rough model of a thesis statement! These models are intended for drafting purposes only and should not appear in your final work.

  • In this essay, I argue ____, using ______ to assert _____.
  • While scholars have often argued ______, I argue______, because_______.
  • Through an analysis of ______, I argue ______, which is important because_______.

Words to Avoid and to Embrace

When drafting your thesis statement, avoid words like explore, investigate, learn, compile, summarize, and explain to describe the main purpose of your paper. These words imply a paper that summarizes or "reports," rather than synthesizing and analyzing.

Instead of the terms above, try words like argue, critique, question, and interrogate. These more analytical words may help you begin strongly, by articulating a specific, critical, scholarly position.

Read Kayla's blog post for tips on taking a stand in a well-crafted thesis statement.

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