Texting And Driving Persuasive Essays

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I’m pretty sure your writing teachers have instructed you on the finer points of writing a variety of essays, including the persuasive essay, compare and contrast essay, and argument essay.

You have these skills fine-tuned and can hold your own with the best of them. The problem is, now you’ve been assigned to write about texting while driving. All you know about it is that it’s banned in your state—and that it’s really hard to resist the temptation to check your phone when you drive.

How do you learn more about your subject? Research, of course.

Even though you don’t know much about the subject (now), you do know that, without at least a few sources, your essay will be derailed, and your grade will be a complete train wreck.

To avoid such a disaster, take control of your paper and check out these 12 (+2) texting while driving articles to get your paper on track.

12 (+2) Texting While Driving Articles

I’ve divided the 12 texting while driving articles below into two basic categories to help you find the information you’re looking for: organizations/statistics and news. I’ve also included two related sources at the end of this post to provide another perspective on texting.

For each source, I’ve included an MLA citation. If you decide to use one of these sources, make sure to change the date of access to the date you viewed the source.

Of course, if you’re using APA (or another citation style), you’ll need to change the citation to the proper format.

4 Texting While Driving Articles on Organizations and Statistics

You might consider using some of the shocking statistics found in these four sources to start your introduction or to convince your readers just how dangerous texting while driving can be.

1. The Dangers of Texting While Driving

Posted by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), this website provides current statistics about texting and driving. It includes links to a variety of resources, including the Distracted Driving Information Clearinghouse and state laws regarding use of electronic devices in vehicles.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“The Dangers of Texting While Driving.” FCC.gov. Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“The Dangers of Texting While Driving.” FCC.gov, Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau, www.fcc.gov/ consumers/guides/dangers-texting-while-driving. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

2. How You Can Help Your Teen

Teen Driver Source, established by The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, provides teen texting and driving statistics, advice for parents, and links to additional resources.

Articles posted on this website are written and/or reviewed by board-certified MDs and PhDs. Therefore, this website is credible and passes the CRAAP test.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“Texting and Driving Facts.” Teen Driver Source. The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“Texting and Driving Facts.” Teen Driver Source, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute,  www.teendriversource.org/more_pages /page/texting_and_driving_facts/for_parents. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

3. Facts and Statistics

Published by the US government, this website includes a variety of useful resources, including definitions, statistics, and resources for teens, parents, schools, and employers.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“Facts and Statistics.” Distraction.gov. US Department of Transportation, n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“Facts and Statistics.” Distraction.gov, US Department of Transportation, www.distraction.gov/stats-research-laws/facts-and-statistics.html. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

4. Distracted Driving

Published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this government website includes statistics, risk factors, and additional resources.

The site contains links to sources cited within the website, further enhancing the credibility of the content.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“Distracted Driving.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. US Department of Health & Human Services, n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“Distracted Driving.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health & Human Services, www.cdc.gov/ motorvehiclesafety/distracted_driving/. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

8 News Articles About Texting While Driving

You can use these texting while driving articles from the news throughout your paper to include additional statistics, offer an overview of the problem, explain why people text, and provide specific examples of those directly impacted by texting while driving.

5. Young People More Likely to Text While Driving If Friends Do: Study

Published by long-time news source U.S. News & World Report, this article includes the results of a University of Maryland study. In the study, the researcher found that college students were more likely to text and drive if their friends engaged in the same risky behavior.

7th Edition MLA Citation

Dallas, Mary Elizabeth. “Young People More Likely to Text While Driving If Friends Do: Study.” U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News & World Report, 16 Feb. 2016. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

Dallas, Mary Elizabeth. “Young People More Likely to Text While Driving If Friends Do: Study.” U.S. News & World Report, 16 Feb. 2016, health.usnews.com/health-news/articles/2016-02-16/young-people-more-likely-to-text-while-driving-if-friends-do-study. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

6. Senate votes to add penalties for texting school bus drivers

Though brief, this Associated Press article reports on the Tennessee senate’s vote to increase penalties of school bus drivers caught texting. The penalty went from a $50 fine to a minimum 30-day jail sentence and a $1,000 fine.

Now published online, the Washington Times newspaper is well-established and was first published in 1982.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“Senate Votes to Add Penalties for Texting School Bus Drivers.” WashingtonTimes.com. The Washington Times, 7 Mar. 2016. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“Senate Votes to Add Penalties for Texting School Bus Drivers.” The Washington Times, 7 Mar. 2016,  www.washingtontimes.com/news/2016/mar/7/ senate-votes-to-add-penalties-for-texting-school-b/. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

7. Middle-Aged Drivers Admit To Using Cell Phones When Behind The Wheel

While many associate texting and driving with teens, a study by the University of California, San Diego reports that middle-aged drivers are also likely to text and drive. The majority of those surveyed said they were most likely to answer calls from work while driving.

The content of this Huffington Post article can be verified easily as the article provides links to the original study cited and to the original authors of the study.

7th Edition MLA Citation

Brenoff, Ann. “Middle-Aged Drivers Admit to Using Cell Phones When Behind the Wheel.” HuffingtonPost.com. Huffington Post, 21 Aug. 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

Brenoff, Ann. “Middle-Aged Drivers Admit to Using Cell Phones When Behind the Wheel.” Huffington Post, 21 Aug. 2015, www.huffingtonpost.com/ entry/middle-aged-drivers-admit-to-using-cell-phones-when-behind-the-wheel_us_55d731cee4b0f593f7f705ff. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

8. Minn. teen charged in fatal texting while driving crash

This article tells the story of a texting and driving 17-year-old girl who killed a father and his young daughter. The teen was posting to Facebook when she ran a red light and slammed into the other vehicle.

The information is published by long-time news source CBS News and is considered credible.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“Texting While Driving, Minnesota Teen Kills Father and Daughter.” CBSNews. CBS Interactive, 20 Oct. 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“Texting While Driving, Minnesota Teen Kills Father and Daughter.” CBSNews, CBS Interactive, 20 Oct. 2015, www.cbsnews.com/news/texting-and-driving-minnesota-teen-kills-father-and-daughter/. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

9. Missouri interest groups push for texting-while-driving ban

This brief article posted in the online version of a credible Washington newspaper reports that groups, including law enforcement and health care workers, are urging lawmakers to ban texting while driving in Missouri.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“Missouri Interest Groups Push for Texting-while-driving Ban.” HeraldCourier.com. Bristol Herald Courier, 7 Mar. 2016. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“Missouri Interest Groups Push for Texting-while-driving Ban.” Bristol Herald Courier, 7 Mar. 2016, www.heraldcourier.com/news/missouri-interest-groups-push-for-texting-while-driving-ban/article_3634194e-901a-56e9-9fea-ba53f3ced404.html. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

10. Texting while driving kills, but will we stop?

Though most people agree that texting while driving is dangerous, in a USA Today study, many people reported that they still text while driving because they simply cannot resist the urge to check their phones.

This source is considered credible as it’s published by the well-respected news source, USA Today.

7th Edition MLA Citation

Bowerman, Mary. “Texting While Driving Kills, but Will We Stop?” USAToday.com. USA Today, 12 Mar. 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

Bowerman, Mary. “Texting While Driving Kills, but Will We Stop?” USA Today, 12 Mar. 2015, www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/03/12/texting-driving-dangerous-behavior/70147834/. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

11. This Teen Glanced At Her Phone For Just A Second And Her Life Changed Forever

Published in conjunction with Huff Post and OWN (Oprah Winfrey Network), this story contains images (some graphic) and details of one girl’s near-death experience and the devastating trauma she has faced because of her decision to text her mom while driving.

7th Edition MLA Citation

Capretto, Lisa. “This Teen Glanced at Her Phone for Just a Second and Her Life Changed Forever.” Huffingtonpost.com. Huffington Post, 7 Mar. 2016. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

Capretto, Lisa. “This Teen Glanced at Her Phone for Just a Second and Her Life Changed Forever.” Huffington Post, 7 Mar. 2016, www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/liz-marks-texting-driving-accident_us_56d878f3e4b0ffe6f8e86932. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

12. Students learn in virtual reality about dangers of texting and driving

Published by an NBC affiliate, this article discusses options to help teens realize the dangers of texting while driving. The article highlights a virtual reality simulator that allows teens to safely experience the dangers of driving while distracted.

7th Edition MLA Citation

Gaither, Mandy. “Students Learn in Virtual Reality about Dangers of Texting and Driving.” WYFF4. NBC, 26 Feb. 2016. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

Gaither, Mandy. “Students Learn in Virtual Reality about Dangers of Texting and Driving.” WYFF4, NBC, 26 Feb. 2016, www.wyff4.com/news/students-learn-in-virtual-reality-about-dangers-of-texting-and-driving/38195384. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

2 Bonus Articles on Texting While Walking

These are the +2 resources I mentioned earlier. Even though texting while walking is certainly different than texting while driving, these two articles point out that texting is causing other problems in our lives.

Texting and walking is not only dangerous to pedestrians, but it can also be a danger to drivers. Why? People who text while walking are more likely to walk into oncoming traffic.

1. Texting While Walking Isn’t Funny Anymore

This timely article published by the well-respected Wall Street Journal informs readers that pedestrian accidents are increasing due to distracted walking. The article also includes a discussion of the ways in which cities are trying to cut down on accidents, such as posting signs and creating texting pathways for pedestrians.

7th Edition MLA Citation

Fowler, Geoffrey A. “Texting While Walking Isn’t Funny Anymore.” WSJ. Wall Street Journal, 17 Feb. 2016. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

Fowler, Geoffrey A. “Texting While Walking Isn’t Funny Anymore.” Wall Street Journal, 17 Feb. 2016, www.wsj.com/articles/texting-while-walking-isnt-funny-anymore-1455734501. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

2. Texting While Walking: Are You Cautious Or Clueless?

This article, published online by NPR (National Public Radio) discusses the dangers of texting and walking. The article reports that those texting and walking not only walk more slowly, but are also more likely to walk into oncoming traffic.

NPR is a multimedia news organization with nationwide departments covering current, relevant information. NPR is certainly considered a credible research source.

7th Edition MLA Citation

“Texting While Walking: Are You Cautious or Clueless?” NPR. NPR, 30 July 2015. Web. 10 Mar. 2016.

8th Edition MLA Citation

“Texting While Walking: Are You Cautious or Clueless?” NPR, 30 July 2015, www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/07/29/427417340/texting-while-walking-are-you-cautious-or-clueless. Accessed 10 Mar. 2016.

Now You’re On Track

“Locomotive changing tracks at Cheddleton Tunnel #3, Staffordshire” by Roger Kidd, Geograph.org.uk (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Starting your research with a few key texting while driving articles or other sources is the perfect way to keep your paper on track.

If your paper about texting while driving is a research-based essay in need of some serious research, check out these sources:

Also, check out these example texting and driving essays written by students just like you. Then don’t forget to read How to Write a Texting While Driving Essay That Doesn’t Suck.

If you’re worried that your paper isn’t the best it can be and might fly off the tracks at any moment, have one of our awesome editors provide some feedback to help put you back on course!

Get free, weekly essay writing tips.

Psst... 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

You’re cruising through your writing class just fine. No speed bumps in the road to a decent grade. But then your instructor decides to put up a roadblock—a texting while driving essay.

You screech to a halt.

You weren’t paying attention to how to write essays most effectively and, instead, just wrote whatever came naturally. But you don’t feel so confident with this one—if you don’t get back on course, you’ll crash and burn.

Kind of like this …

People you know probably text while they drive, right? Maybe you even do it yourself. It’s one of those things your teacher doesn’t want students (or anyone else) doing. That’s why your assignment is a texting while driving essay.

Yawn, right?

I get it … there’s only so much you can say about the subject. It’s bad to do. Everyone knows that. But there are interesting, fresh, and exciting ways to write your texting while driving essay.

I’ll show you how to write your own essay with a little bit of oomph, all with some help from a couple of guys who know about oomph (and how to not be distracted drivers)—Jake and Elwood Blues, better known as the Blues Brothers.

Key Ingredients to a Great Texting While Driving Essay

Before you jump right into writing your essay, it might be helpful to know exactly what will take it to the next level. That way, you can make it awesome from the start and won’t have to rewrite the whole thing.

The first thing to think about is what type of essay it is. Because everyone knows texting while driving is dangerous, it’ll probably be a persuasive essay. That means you must convince your reader not to text and drive.

In rare cases, it might be an argumentative essay in which you have to choose a side for or against texting while driving. But for the purposes of this post, I’m going to assume it’s persuasive.

Like with any persuasive essay, there are three important elements to consider: your audience, your purpose, and the benefits of your position. The best way to flesh these out before writing is with an outline.

For your outline, you’ll want to including space for the introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion. I’m going to center my example under the assumption that the reason the cop cars in the video above crashed is that they were distracted by their cellphones.

  1. Introduction
    1. Hook: Anyone can be a distracted driver, even those who are supposed to protect the public from harm. Texting while driving causes 3,000 teen traffic fatalities every year.
    2. Thesis Statement: In order to save lives and millions of dollars in property damage, drivers need to leave their phones out of sight.
  2. Body Paragraph #1
    1. Define and call out to your audience
      1. It is the responsibility of all drivers to understand the power they have behind the wheel and that they can easily take a human life or destroy someone else’s property. Texting while driving can cause otherwise smart individuals to become so distracted that they drive their cars into malls and put hundreds of people in danger. (Quick note: You definitely need to see this.)
  3. Body Paragraph #2
    1. Explain what the reader needs to do
      1. It’s time for those on the road to put down their cellphones while they are behind the wheel.
  4. Body Paragraph #3
    1. Benefits of your stance
      1. By ceasing to text while driving, drivers can protect the lives of others and themselves, as well as keep cars and property intact.
  5. Conclusion
    1. Drivers can ensure they don’t end up destroying malls and causing 20-car pileups with one simple solution—not texting and driving.

(Note: My example outline is incomplete. Make sure your own outline levels are each divided into at least two parts.)

It’s important to note that the wording of these elements doesn’t have to be final. But you want a general idea of what you’re going to write and to make sure the information is all in the right order.

Check out these example texting while driving essays for inspiration:

The Negative Effects of Texting While Driving

An Introduction to the Issue of Texting and Driving

A Report on Road Accidents Caused by the Use of Cell Phones While Driving

The Negative Effects of the Use of Cellular Phones While Driving

(Note: The above essays vary by format, but they’ll serve as good fodder for finding the angle you want to take in your own texting while driving essay.)

Finding Your Angle

There are a lot of different ways to approach a texting while driving essay—you just have to think outside the box a little. So here are a few angles you could take:

1. Be a little narrative

While this isn’t a narrative essay, it might help the reader understand the severity of the consequences of texting while driving if you include some examples you or someone you know has experienced. You should still avoid first person while writing your essay, but the information makes it more personal.

Example: The police officers could have caught and arrested the Blues Brothers for the many laws they had broken, but the officers were so distracted by their cellphones that they pulled out in front of oncoming traffic and ended up colliding with a semi-truck. Luckily, no one was killed in this instance, but there are many more cases where the people involved aren’t as fortunate.

2. Offer some alternatives

Think about why people text while they drive, and then offer some alternatives that are still suitable solutions to their needs.

Example: Instead of replying to that text, people should have someone else in the car—the deputy, a brother, or a friend—do it for them.

3. Make a dramatic call to action

Don’t make it completely unrealistic, but state what some of the consequences should be for texting while driving.

Example: Anyone who is caught texting while driving should have to pay, at minimum, a $250 fine. If officers or other societal protectors are caught texting while driving, they should be put on suspension or fired if there are multiple offenses.

Some Texting While Driving Thesis Statement Examples

So now that you have an idea about how to write your texting while driving essay, it’s time to get into more of the specifics.

First, you’ll want a strong thesis statement, which is a sentence (or two) in your introduction that explains your position. You need to show you mean business with this statement, so be clear.

Here are a few examples:

Example 1: Because texting while driving is the leading cause of traffic fatalities among teens in the United States, all drivers—teens and adults—should take more responsibility and put the phone down when they are behind the wheel.

Example 2: Parents and older siblings must set good examples for others by not texting and driving.

Example 3: Due to the lack of personal responsibility of most drivers, the government should make newer, harsher laws against texting and driving.

How to Choose Your Sources

As I said before, this is not a narrative essay. This means you’ll need some sources to back up your statements. There are many websites you can visit to get information, such as the CDC, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, and the Texting and Driving Safety website.

The main thing to keep in mind when choosing your sources is whether they’re credible.

This doesn’t mean they have to be a government website or published study (although those are awesome sources!). It just means they have to have some substance to back up what they’re saying.

  • Does the information have a bibliography?
  • Does it reference or link to published studies?
  • Does it link to a credible agency?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes, you’re almost golden. I say “almost” because the final thing to check is how recent the statistics are. Texting and driving is a growing trend, so statistics from 2013 are already outdated.

For more information on choosing your sources, read How to Apply the CRAAP Test to Your Essay Sources.

Asserting Your Validity

So you have all your ducks in a row, but you’re still not sure if your argument is convincing enough. Will your reader question your position’s validity? Not if you follow a couple of simple rules.

  • Rule #1: Don’t waiver. Staying strong in your position shows you are certain about it. That certainty shows the reader you know what you’re talking about.
  • Rule #2: Have support to back it up. Show some facts and figures. Quote credible sources. Don’t fill your entire texting while driving essay with numbers, but use enough supportive examples so that no one can question the truth of your statements.

Do you feel a little more ready to write now? Well, good! Get to writing then!

If you finish and want another set of eyes to look it over, send your essay to one of the Kibin editors. They’ll make sure it flows well and make any needed suggestions for changes to ensure it doesn’t end up a mess like this:

Get free, weekly essay writing tips.

Psst... 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

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